Reclaimed Staircase

Rustic Pine Staircase, Reclaimed Pine Staircase and Handrails

I love projects like this! We took a boring and unsafe staircase and made it beautiful and safe.  Using clear southern yellow pine for the treads and reclaimed pine beams and lumber we created a unique rustic staircase that suits this barndominium.

Unfinished OSB Staircase

Like most staircases, this one started with OSB.  If you have an ugly staircase, don’t worry, it can be transformed into something that suits your home and style.

You’ll notice that this staircase does not have any kind of handrail or safety rail.  It was quite unsettling at the top which is about 14ft.  A proper handrail that meets code is essential for safety and ease of use.

This is the outside or barn area so there was really no need to do what we did here.  A simple handrail would have been fine.  However, we are slowly taking this area and polishing it up to look like the beautiful rustic home on the inside.  I think we succeeded.

For the treads and landings, we used clear Southern Yellow Pine.  Using Clear Pine for the stair treads vs Knotty Pine stair treads costs more but yields a better result.  Clear pipe lumber is more stable than knotty pine so there will be less chance of splits, warps, cupping, or twisting later on.

DIY Rustic Pine Stair Treads for a Farmhouse Staircase in a barndominium
Clear Southern Yellow Pine Stair Treads

The handrails are made with reclaimed lumber.  The story behind the lumber is really cool.  The barndominium is built on land that has been on this family for generations and is near what amounts to a little ghost town outside of Caldwell, Texas.  In this community there once was a store.  The store belonged to my client’s grandmother.  Many years after the store was closed it was torn down and much of the lumber was saved.  This is the lumber we used for the handrails.

rustic farmhouse staircase with reclaimed lumber handrails
Handrails made from reclaimed pine

To hold the posts in place we cut a half-lap joint in the wood so that it could sit partly on the treads and be connected to the sides with lag bolts.  This makes for an incredibly strong post that won’t be going anywhere.

Once everything was installed we sanded everything and started the finishing process.

The prep for finishing is always time-consuming but is the key to a great looking finish.  We spend about 4-5 hours filling nail holes and sanding everything up to 220 grit.  After thoroughly cleaning off the dust we started from the top and worked our way to the bottom staining all the treads with English Chestnut by Minwax.

Sealing the treads was the same process of starting from the top and working our way to the bottom.  We did two coats of Minwax Polyurethane for Floors. I absolutely recommend going with the oil-based formula.  You’ll need mineral spirits to clean it up but an oil-based polyurethane will hold up longer than a water-based polyacrylic.

Here are the finished treads with the risers done

The final step was to build a safety gate for the top landing.  My client’s children and grandchildren come to visit and keeping the grandbabies safe is crucial.  We built these gates out of reclaimed lumber in the same way we build our custom barn doors.

 

This was a great project and the second I have done for this great clients.  We built a Murphy Bed for her last her and we have several more improvement to make to this barndominium in the future.

If you live in the Brazos Valley we are happy to help you with your next carpentry, remodeling, or home improvement project.  We serve Bryan, College Station, Caldwell, Snook, Somerville and surrounding areas.  CONTACT US today to schedule a free estimate.

Want to see how we did it? Watch Below

Tell us what you think in the comments below.

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