Hitachi C10RJ Table Saw Features and Overview – The Ultimate Review Part 2 of 3

I’ve been running this saw for two weeks now so I know enough about it to offer educated opinions. Be sure to subscribe to this blog and my YouTube channel because I will give you long term updates.

I’m a mobile carpenter, cabinet maker, and woodworker. My shop is and must be completely portable (The Dailey Portable Shop). Therefore a full-size cabinet saw just isn’t an option. Jobsite saws have come a long way. They are powerful, accurate, and have cleverly designed rip fences that allow a much larger rip capacity than their size would suggest. I’ve only ever had a jobsite saw and consistently produce high quality cabinetry on site.


Now the best saw for me may not be the best for you. Some of you may only need a small bench top saw that’s easy to move and store. Me, I want the absolute biggest saw I can get.  The great thing is that there are a plethora of high quality jobsite saws to choose from.  I’d recommend sticking to the professional grade jobsite saws even if you’re a DIY’er.  These are Dewalt, Ridgid, Bosch, and Hitachi.

As I said in part one, I narrowed my search down to the Dewalt DWE7491RS, Ridgid R4513, and the Hitachi C10RJ.

I went with the Hitachi Table Saw for several reasons

  • 35 inch rip capacity – this is the largest in it’s class
  • Rotating Fence for large rip cuts – I really like the fence design. It rotates to serve as material support when extended and has easy to use latches to lock it down.
  • Rack and Pinion fence adjustment – The fence is locked into one of two positions and your cut is adjusted by parallel bars driven by gears.  This keeps the fence parallel to the blade at all times, and allows for quick one and adjustment.  With other style fences you have to make sure its pressed against the track as you lock it down or it may be out of square.  This often requires two hands.
  • 13/16 Dado Capacity – My old saw only had a 1/4 capacity.  It was never worth it to by the dado stack.  Having the ability to run a full size dado stack opens up a lot of possibilities.
  • Integrated Stand – My old saw didn’t come with a stand.  I eventually bought one and was very happy with it. The Hitachi Fold and Roll Stand is made just for this saw and it works well with the saw.  Another plus of the stand is that it is rock solid.  You can push large sheet goods through the saw without it tipping over.  With lesser stands this is a huge safety hazard.  The saw with the stand sits right at 36″ working height.
  • Value – This saw shares a lot in common in both looks and design with the more expensive Dewalt Saw.  With the all the 2017 Christmas sales going on right now I was able to get the Hitachi for $200 less than the Dewalt.  You really do get a lot in both features and quality with this saw.

Full Video Review

In the video I go over all the adjustments and features of the saw.  If you have any questions please leave a comment below.  I do my best to answer all the comments.


Thanks for reading.  Be sure to check out my article on recommended saw blades for all your saws.

 

New Table Saw! Hitachi C10RJ Jobsite Table Saw – The Ultimate Review Part 1 of 3


This is part 1 of 3 posts I’m doing over my new table saw.  Breaking it apart keeps each section shorter and easier to digest.

  1. Part One – Unboxing and Assembly
  2. Part Two – Features and Review
  3. Part Three – Comparison between my old and new saw

Why this Saw?

In short, my old jobsite saw is getting worn out from years of heavy use and it needed to be replaced.  I played with saws in the store, read reviews, and debated the pros and cons of each.

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DeWalt Variable Speed Random Orbit Sander Review

My old sander threw a bearing…or something and just became unbearable to use.  So I got the DEWALT D26453K 3 Amp 5-Inch Variable Speed Random Orbit Sander Kit with Cloth Dust Bag.  I didn’t do a lot of research but I figured DeWalt or Bosch would be a good sander.  The DeWalt came with a multiple sized dust adapters so I got it.

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Multi-year Review of the Craftsman C3 Cordless Tools

Craftsman C3 19.2 Volt Lithium Ion Combo Kit
Craftsman C3 Kit

Many Christmases ago, 2009 by my best estimation I received the Craftsman 19.2 Volt Combo Kit.  It
included a drill, a circular saw, a reciprocating saw, a light, and 2 Ni-Cad batteries with charger.  This kit was purchased from the Sears Outlet and was marked as “reconditioned.”  I have used these tools extensively over the last 6 years and still use the original tools, minus the batteries.

With this set I have built a 10×20 ft Storage building, broken down dozens of sheets of plywood, built deer blinds, done demo work with the reciprocating saw, and remodeled a bathroom.  The original drill has been dropped from roofs, left out in the rain, drilled thousands of holes and driven as many screws.  The saw is my go to tool for breaking down sheet goods and is easy to handle.  The reciprocating saw is OK with a good blade but eats batteries too quickly.

For some reason these tools have a bad rap, many say they are cheap and wont last, but my set is older than the “C3” branding and is still going strong with the new Lithium-Ion Batteries.

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I’m Going Modular

I’ve been following Ron Paulk’s build of his “Awesome Rolling Toolbox” on YouTube. He owns a home construction/remodeling business and has very creative solutions for organization and workflow.

Right now he is building out a new trailer for his work. Using Sketchup he is trying different designs and configurations to get the best possible layout for his tools.

Borrowing his ideas and the principles of a modular system I think I’ve found a system of shop furniture that will “go the distance.”

After a couple of years of failed organization attempts I think I’ve found a solution that will make my life in the workshop easier. It can also be transferred to a mobile work area if/when needed.  It is a basic cabinet that I’m going to build a lot of.

This cabinet will be the basic building block of my shop for the foreseeable future.  The hardest thing, for me, was to figure on the base size that would be the most efficient.  I chose the DeWalt Deep Pro Organizer as my base size for my modular system.

I bought one on a whim at Home Depot, and I love it.  I have two of these; one for most of my screws, and one that I’m using for my router bit storage.  They lock securely and stack on one another.  So I plan on adding more to hold and organize different tools.  The bins are removable so you can remake the inside to fit whatever purpose you desire.  Using their size I found my basic size needed for my modular system.  However there was one problem.

The problem is my Craftsman 165-piece Mechanics Set.  It’s case is slightly bigger than the DeWalt Organizer.  I’m going to quit storing my tools in their supplied cases and size their boxes accordingly with my new system. However the supplied case for over 150 sockets, wrenches, and ratchets is one I’m not willing to part with.  Therefore, I sized up my minimum shelf size to fit this set.

For everything else that wont fit in a DeWalt Organizer I am going to build drawers to fit them.  My space between dadoes is 5 inches.  So I can build custom drawers five, ten, or fifteen inches depending on the tool.  Instead of using drawer slides and hardware I’m going to let the bottom of the drawers/shelves slide into the 1/2″ Dadoes.  Since 1/2 ply is less than 1/2″ they will slide in and out easily enough.  This will also also make it possible to quickly remove the entire box and take it to the work when needed.

modular 1I decided to size the boxes to 31.5 inches.  This way when I when I brace for casters, add casters and a top I can get it to 36″ which is a good working height for me.  I’m also left with about a 2 1/2 drawer on the top of each box where I can put small supplies and equipment specific tools.  I can stack the boxes for tall cabinets, bolt them together for a workbench base, or have them as independent workstations for power tools.  Also with this design if I ever have to move I can nail a piece of hardboard to the front and load the boxes straight on a truck.  I’ll probably have a mess when I get to the new place, but it will be easy to layout a new shop.

You’ll see from the model of my shop that I do have some dead space in places.  That is a negative of a modular system verses building for the exact space.  But I feel that I’ll end up with less dead space overall by each cabinet’s efficiency

modular 9

I’m building the tops and sides from 3/4 ply and the back and shelves will either be 1/2 or 3/8 plywood (I’ll probably go with 3/8 for cost savings.)

That’s pretty much it.  I’m going to build a couple of these and see how it goes.  Then, I’ll gradually build out the rest of my shop.

This system wont work for absolutely everything, but I think it will make a good foundation.  When I combine this system with french cleats, peg board, and a lumber rack I think I’ll finally have an organized shop.

What do you think of this system for cabinets?

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