Why Did I Just Get an Email?

If you received an unprompted email from Dailey Woodworks asking you to confirm your subscription for new posts…We can explain.

We’ve been working on marketing, social media, and a stronger web presence.  Part of this includes having you subscribed to this blog for new posts and content.  If you’d rather not be subscribed please feel free to unsubscribe… but before you do…

Word of mouth, and repeat customers makes up about 90% of our business.  This means a great deal to me.  Without that Dailey Woodworks wouldn’t exist.  I hope to bring you meaningful and interesting posts of projects, DIY articles, and other resources that will benefit my customers and subscribers.  There is also the self-centered goal of staying at the forefront of your mind so Dailey Woodworks will be your first call or referral for new work.  I hope to earn that privilege as well.

Thank you for being part of the Dailey Woodworks community, and have a blessed day!

Office Remodel

I don’t do a lot of commercial work, but I will for certain situations, namely friends.  My mechanic and former employer from WAY back called me to refresh his office space.  I wonder why?

The paneling had to go.  Scratch that,  everything had to go.  We did a full gut of the office space.  Lights, ceilings, walls, floors all replaced.

We had planned on simply replacing the ceiling tiles on the drop ceiling and painting the cross members, but because it was so old it was easily damaged beyond repair.  We redid the entire ceiling and installed new LED office lights.  This was the first and hopefully last drop ceiling I install.  I think it turned out well.

The next phase was drywall.  We did a light knock down texture painted gray.  Trim was a nice cream color and doors a deep red.

The old used-to-be-red vinyl tiles were replaced with a nice ceramic.  This was installed by a sub-contractor as I’m no good at tile work.  

Once the walls were painted, tile work done, and trim installed it was time to install a coffee bar.  We went with a budget friendly option by using inexpensive yet high quality stock cabinets.  These were solid oak face frames and drawer fronts with complete plywood construction.  NEVER buy particle board cabinets.  We stained them and installed them.  A local countertop company installed some nice granite.

Cleaned up and ready to move back in…

Finished

A huge THANK YOU to the owners of B&B Automotive for allowing Dailey Woodworks to renew your office space.  If you live in the Brazos Valley and need a good mechanic they are the people to go to.

Custom Murphy Bed Build

If you live in the Brazos Valley, and would like me to build a custom Murphy Bed for your home contact me for an estimate.

Shortly before Christmas I was commissioned to build a Murphy Bed.  Building a custom Murphy Bed is a project I have been wanting to do for a long time.  My wife and I had talked about building one for our guest/craft room, but it just never seemed to happen.  So when I got the chance to build one I jumped at the opportunity.

After some research we chose to use a professionally made hardware kit from Create-a-Bed.  There are several less expensive ways of putting a bed together but with something like this hacking together a cheap mechanism just creates problems.  By using a high quality hardware kit it saved time and therefore the client money in the end.  Also, the hardware comes with a Lifetime Warranty, which is reassuring.

This is what you get in the kit:
On each side of the Murphy Bed I built a bookcase.  Following the “Rule of thirds” each bookcase is a third of the width of the Murphy bed.  I also set the book shelves back from the face of the Murphy bed for some visual appeal.

(The “Rule of Thirds” refers to the idea that the human eye finds a 1:3 and 2:3 ratio visually appealing.  Take a look at your doors, cabinets, and dressers and you’ll see this in practice). 

We debated painting the bed white, but I’m very happy that we decided to stain it.  To add detail I made a faux door frame once again using the “rule of thirds.” to finish it up I added baseboard and crown molding.  A Murphy Bed can be taken from a ultra modern look to Victorian depending on the details you choose to add, or not add.

The Murphy Bed itself (for the full size, vertical mount) comes out from the wall 16inches, is 82inches tall, and has a width of 60inches (5ft).  Each book case is 82h x 20w x 12d.

The gas struts make raising and lowering the bed easy.  A firm tug lowers the bed and it can be closed with one finger.  My client is a very small person and had no issues raising and lowering the mechanism.

It is necessary to anchor the bed to at least 3 wall studs.  And while it is a semi-permanent addition to your home it can be partially disassembled and moved if the need ever arises.

Murphy Beds can be made to be either vertical or horizontal and are available. in Twin, Full, or Queen sizes.

Double Bunk Beds

I love building custom furniture.  However, it’s rare that I get orders for custom builds.  These bunk beds were built for Peach Creek Ranch, a wedding an event venue serving the area.

It’s no secret that I post videos to Youtube, but Youtube is also where I go to learn new skills and gather inspiration.  Jay Bates is one of the Youtube Woodworkers I really enjoy following.  His projects are well thought out, not overly complicated, and he uses materials that everyone reasonably has access to.  I used his plans for my bunkbeds.

I modified his EXCELLENT plans to squeeze a double “L” shaped bunk bed into the space available.  I was downright scarred about halfway through thinking that it wasn’t going to fit.  (I forgot to allow for the posts, and the thickness of the baseboards, but with a few modifications it all fit).

Dimensional lumber is cheap and easy to get.  I spent an hour at Home Depot digging through the pile to find the best boards.  Furniture built with 2x lumber seems “blocky” to me so I planed it all down to 1 1/4″ thick and ripped it a little narrower.  2×4’s and 2×6’s can be quite beautiful after 3 passes through a thickness planner. This made six bags full of shavings.

I tried to use my shop vac but ended up rigging a box and drop cloth up to catch all the shavings.

The ladder was very easy to make.  I used my miter saw to cut some dados and then glued and screwed the rungs to the rails.  It’s very strong.

This project was a lot of fun.  And the couple I worked for are some great people.  If you live in the Brazos Valley and would like custom furniture or built-ins made contact me.

 

 

 

The Dailey Portable Shop – Version 2.0

After almost a year I’ve made 10 big modifications to my trailer design and layout.  Mostly these have been gradual improvements as I’ve had both time and money.  Some were bad ideas, but even our mistakes can lead us to drastic improvements.  If, of course, we learn from them.  Enter Trailer 2.0

You can catch up on everything trailer related by checking out my YouTube playlist by clicking here.

If you don’t feel like watching ten 10-minute videos here’s the gist:

  • Trailer: Cargo Mate 6ft x 12xft V-nose, ramp rear door, side door, tandem axles.  I bought this trailer used in early 2016 after cleaning out my savings.
  • My only shop:  This trailer is my only shop.  I don’t have a garage, I don’t have a carport, My entire shop (save some specialty tools) fits in this trailer.
  • Set up to build bunk beds
    Set up to build bunk beds

    It’s a PORTABLE shop, not a mobile shop:  Meaning, the trailer acts as a tool room.  All my tools, workbenches, require set up on location.  They aren’t set up in the trailer.  The advantage is I’m able to set up the “shop” where and as the specific job allows for the best workflow.  Instead of walking all the way from the work to the trailer for every cut.

  • Efficiency is the goal:  The popular term right now is LEAN. Which can be summed up by: Eliminate Waste!  Eliminate wasted space, wasted movement, wasted weight, waste materials… all with the goal of eliminating wasted time.  I’ll also note that safety is naturally built into this mindset.
    • img_1974I try to strike a balance between ease of access and space savings.  I lean towards ease of access.  I work by the job, so the more streamlined I can make getting the right tool without moving unneeded tools the better.
    • Everything in it’s place and a place for everything.  This is the ultimate goal.  I’ve gone so far as to label drawer, bins, shelves.  I’m not there yet but I’m getting closer.
    • Make it easy.  When it comes to organization if it’s not easy to put back it probably wont be.  I’m learning this with my safety items.  They’re hard to get to so I don’t use them as I should.  Other things, however, are easier to put back in their correct place than they are to misplace.  <[That’s the goal]
    • img_1973I use passive restraints as much as possible.  Bungees and latches slow me down.  They also are forgotten, greeting you with a mess at the beginning of the day.  I’m trying to remove these from my trailer, and rely on ledges, gravity, and friction to hold things in place.  My table saw hold down is a perfect example of this.
  • I love it!:  Yes I wish I had a large climate controlled building to work out of.  However, I get twice as much done out of my trailer than I ever did in my set up shop.  I just want the large building to back the trailer up to.  I now laugh at people who complain about their two-car garage shops being to small.  It’s not you just need to get organized.

img_1976

 

$30 DIY Miter Saw Stand

My miter saw broke,  and so did the Delta Miter Saw Stand that I’ve been using for almost a year.

For most carpenters, the miter saw is an absolute necessity.  It’s a little funny since for the woodworker the table saw would be the most important stationary/bench tool.  Now that I’m in the field, it’s the miter saw that sees the most use.  Probably 3 to 1 compared to the table saw.  (I couldn’t function long without either)

The Delta stand was nice but didn’t hold up to bouncing around in my Rolling Workshop.  Neither did my Craftsman miter saw, but that’s a different post.

I replaced my saw and decided to ditch the Delta stand for my own “Shop Made” miter saw stand.  Most of the really good crown guys I’ve come across have made their own unique stands to fit their workflow and the type of work they do.  Therefore take my design with the idea of using the concept for your own needs rather than making an exact copy.

Ridgid 10 Inch Miter Saw, DIY Miter saw Stand

Getting a different type of miter saw stand like this DeWalt was something I debated for a while.  In the end, it was better to make what I wanted/needed than use a commercially available stand.  The issue with the manufactured miter saw stands is that they are made as a “one-size-fits-all” product and that just doesn’t work.  They’re are too many different miter saws and a huge variance in how they are used.  Therefore making your own is the way I thing most people should go.

The stands for table saws are different in that they just hold the saw in position.  The table saw itself is all the work surface you need, other than a simple out-feed table.  Miter saw stands are asked to do a lot more.

My stand had to do several things.

  • The first was to break down into a compact package that stored easily in my trailer.  The Delta Stand took up A LOT of space.  I wanted the stand to break in to 3 pieces: The base, and two extension wings.  (I mounted a piece of plywood to the saw itself, so four if you want to be picky)
  • Ridgid Miter Saw StandThe second thing was that I wanted at least 4ft on each side of the blade to hold material.  I also wanted a large surface that I could lay a 2×12 on without it falling or tipping.  Each wing is 4ft long and this gives me almost five feet of support on each side of the blade.  That is plenty for my work.
  • The third thing is that I wanted the stand to be made from on sheet of 3/4″ plywood.  Home depot carries some nice Radita Pine 6-ply plywood that I really like for cabinets, jigs, and just about everything.  It’s $30.00 a sheet in my area.

 

I didn’t really have a design in mind when I made the stand, just a concept.  The stand definitely needs some improvements, but as far as the idea goes I think it is solid.  I’m going to keep refining and tweaking it.  One there I may show you how to build this design.  But for now I’m just sharing my “proof-of-concept” for you to use for inspiration for your own.

Also here is another DIY stand that a carpenter made to meet his needs.  It’s what inspired me to make my own.

 

Rusty’s Remodel Part 3 – Kitchen Remodel

This will be the last post of this series.  There was a lot of painting, drywall repairs throughout the rest of the house. All of which were fairly basic and not “wow” transformational.  The Kitchen, however, was the crowning achievement of this project.

The credit for this Kitchen doesn’t go to me but to Wright Custom Woodworks.  All I did was paint and install the hardware.  Bo, completely changed and refaced the cabinets to a nice modern-classic look.  He’s also a great guy.  I’ve recommended him to several people for custom cabinet work, and will continue to do so.

Here are the Pictures: Click on them to open the gallery.

 

 

The Business of Carpentry Episode 2 – The Road to Self-Employment

I’m coming up on one year of being self employed as a Carpenter.  It has been awesome, stressful, scary, fulfilling, and fun.  It is downright the best career decision I’ve made in my life.  In this episode I share a little more of my journey.  Hopefully, you can pick up some tips or simply understand the path a little more.

Rusty’s Remodel Part 2 (Bedroom Addition)

Check Out Part One of this Series

Last week I showed the before and afters of the exterior of this home.  One my summer helper and I finished the exterior repairs and painting we moved inside to build a wall.  This rental was to be targeted at college students so another bedroom would help maximize the income potential of this property.  The front den/living room was fairly small and there is a large common area that connects what is now the Living/Dinning area to the kitchen.

The process was fairly simple.  Build a wall seperating the entry way from the living area.  Install a door, build a closet.  For the closet we used a nice, and expensive, double mirrored sliding door.  I was impressed with how easy it was to install.  We then waited, forever, for the electricians to finish their part then finished the drywall and painting.

Rusty’s Remodel – Part 1(Exterior)

I was leaving Home Depot, again.  When I get a phone call.  On the other end is an excited guy who just bought his first rental property, and he’s writing a book about it.  Okay….? That’s different.  He wanted me to build a wall or something.  We set up a time to meet for an estimate and I head back to the house I was painting.

As a carpenter/small business owner I come across all types of people and personalities.  Most good, some annoying, and a few bad.  Then occasionally you’ll meet a guy like Rusty. Someone who is genuinely a great person, and then you get to work for him.  It also turned into my biggest job since moving back to the Brazos Valley.

He originally wanted an estimate to convert a Den/Living room into a bedroom.  Texas A&M University is the life blood of College Station.  Rusty purchased a house near campus that is a prime candidate for students.  More bedrooms more rent, it’s that simple.  We talked about the scope of work and I ask him to let me give him a bid on painting the exterior, doing some cabinet work, etc.  We talked about how he needed the job done by the first of August, I said I could do it, we finished at the end of the first week of August…which was not entirely my fault.

Here is the Exterior Work:

 

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